Henkel and Quad partner for printed electronics

Henkel Adhesive Technologies and Quad Industries have expanded their existing collaboration to create, prototype and manufacture printed electronics via flatbed screen printing.

Quad Industries has partnered with Henkel for design creation, prototyping and manufacturing of printed electronics.

Henkel’s Adhesive Technologies business unit has a broad portfolio of conductive inks and coatings that enable flexible, cost-efficient and high-performing applications. Stijn Gillissen, head of Printed Electronics at Henkel, explained: “Our network enables us to provide customers not only with products and knowledge, but also connecting them with circuit designers, printing manufacturers or external IoT specialists. Together we can leverage the potential of digital transformations by utilizing the benefits of printed electronics.”

Quad Industries, based in Sint-Niklaasmin Belgium, specialises in developing user interfaces, control panels and sensing devices for both consumer and industrial applications. Arne Casteleyn, managing director of Sales and Strategy at Quad Industries, commented: “At Quad Industries we see the growing potentials for electronics manufacturers to innovate with new material solutions provided by leading material suppliers such as Henkel.”

He continued: “By enlarging our strategic partnership with Henkel, we aim to strengthen the creation of printed electronics solutions such as electronic skin patches, stretchable sensors, film heaters or film antennas and even accelerate the time to market.”

He cited a recent collaboration where Quad Industries and Henkel teamed up with four other medical and technology companies to help the medical services company Byteflies develop a smart health patch for remote patient monitoring. The system was initially set up to monitor the vital functions of patients with heart failure and epilepsy. But following the outbreak of Covid-19 it was repurposed for coronavirus patients. 

This new Covid-19 smart health patch allows continuous, remote, and wireless monitoring of patients’ respiration, heart rate, and temperature and is already applied by numerous hospitals in Flanders, Belgium, to monitor up to 300 patients infected with the virus. Henkel has developed medical electrodes and conductive inks that enable the patch to be used for five days rather than just one. Quad Industries printed the electronic circuit on a very thin and stretchable foil and integrated the technology into the wearable patches.

Henkel and Quad Industries have now expanded the strategic partnership they began in 2019. Gillissen explained: “The closer collaboration will enable us to offer our customers a ‘one-stop shop’ for prototyping printed electronics innovations in a matter of weeks,” adding: “As our trusted ecosystem partner Quad Industries will support the prototyping, design creation and manufacturing of printed electronics via flatbed screen printing. This includes the optimization of printed sensors based on Henkel´s materials know-how as well as the production of high-volume applications.”

Casteleyn says that the partnership will give customers direct access to the companies´ R&D teams, noting: “Together we can offer quick feasibility analysis and fast functional prototyping of novel customer ideas.”

You can find further details at henkel.com and quad-ind.com.


…with a little help from my friends

If you value independent journalism then please consider making a donation to help support Printing and Manufacturing Journal. There’s no advertising or other income attached to this site as my aim is to provide impartial and in-depth information to all readers. However, it takes time to carry out interviews and check facts so if this site is of interest to you then please support my work. You can find more information about me here.


Posted

in

, ,

by

Tags:

Syndicate content

You can license the articles from Printing and Manufacturing Journal to reproduce in other publications. I generally charge around £150 per article but I’m open to discussing this for each title, particularly for publishers that want to use multiple stories. I can provide high res versions of images for print publications.

I’m used to working with overseas publishers and am registered for VAT with the UK’s HMRC tax authority but obviously won’t charge VAT to companies outside the UK. You can find further details and a licensing form from this page, or just contact me directly here.

Support this site

If you find the stories here useful then please consider making a donation to help fund Printing and Manufacturing Journal, either as a one-off or a repeat payment. Journalism is only really useful if it’s truly independent and this is the only such news source serving the print/ manufacturing sectors.

However, there are costs involved in travelling to cover events, as well as maintaining this site, not to mention the time that it takes to carry out research, check facts and interview people. So if you value this work, then please help to maintain it and keep it free to read.

Subscribe

Never miss a story – subscribe to Printing and Manufacturing Journal to receive an email notification every time an article is published here. It’s completely free of charge and you can cancel the subscription at any point without any hassle. There’s no need to provide any information other than an email address and subscribers details are not for sale so there’s no risk of any further marketing spam.

Related stories

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *