GIS to support Toshiba Tec CF3 heads

Global Inkjet Systems, which is best known for supplying drive electronics for a range of printheads, has developed solutions to support Toshiba Tec’s CF3 head.

GIS has developed the DHB TT CF3 head board to work with its new HMB DG head management board.

This includes a new GIS Head Management Board, the HMB-DG, based on the latest GIS Ethernet platform. The HMB includes print data management, waveform control and printhead diagnostics, all accessed over Ethernet.

There’s also a new digital head board, the DHB-TT-CF3, which sits between the printheads and the HMB-DG, adapting the signals for the CF3 heads. This combination of HMB-DG  and DHB-TT-CF3 can drive up to four of the Toshiba TEC CF3 printheads.

GIS also offers the SEB-EPD expansion module for single board solutions, which allows allows integrated encoding and product detect management.

The CF3 is a compact head that’s aimed at a wide range of industrial applications and can handle oil-based and UV curable inks. It has an interesting ink recirculation system that ensures the ink flows right through to each nozzle, and which Toshiba Tec says can cope with inks of reasonably high viscosity. 

It has a print width of 53.95mm, with 1278 nozzles, arranged in two rows. There’s a choice between a single 600npi channel or two 300npi channels. The minimum drop size is 3-4pl with six greyscale levels. There are two variants, with the standard CF3 using air cooling while the CF3R includes a port for water cooling.

It’s not a new head, with the first samples first appearing back in 2016. Neil Cook, head of marketing for GIS, explains: “We didn’t have the demand when the printhead was first launched, but now we see it coming through.”  He adds: “The head itself is a good addition to our product range as it’s a very compact high resolution printhead with excellent jet straightness.”

GIS already supports the older Toshiba Tec CF1/ CF1L and CF1XL series. You can find more information on the electronics from globalinkjetsystems.com and on the printheads from toshibatec.com.


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