Tilia announces cloud solution

Canadian software house Tilia Labs, which has developed a range of imposition and planning solutions, has unveiled a new offering, Tilia Cloud, to help printers better manage their data online.

Tilia Labs has developed the Tilia Cloud, an online platform that will allow different software systems to be connected together.

This is a cloud-based IoT toolkit that’s been developed for printing and packaging. The idea is to gather data in real-time from connected devices and to pull useful information from that data to automate actions. It also enables companies to share licenses and to centralise resources

Sagen de Jonge, Tilia Lab’s CEO, says that the company has been working on this concept for some time now, explaining: “It’s built on a scaleable cloud system so without us putting in too much effort it can scale from tens to hundreds of thousands of users. We are quite a small company so that’s important to us because we don’t want to dedicate the resources to have lots of people supporting this system.”

He adds: “We have built the system with micro servers and have made a generic platform using AWS but could use any other system such as Google because it’s not platform dependent. But the way we have designed it allows us to use things like Lambda functions as a service and scaleable database.”

He says that the system has a very flexible approach to security so that users can put their own security in place, and that this can go right down to limiting access to individual folders. User accounts are kept separate and each individual user has to expressly give permission to share any data with another account. 

But the real strength of the system lies in its ability to automatically generate code to connect different systems – what de Jonge refers to as the ‘crud code that takes a long time to write’ – and which will speed up the development and integration of different layers of software. 

De Jonge explains: “When systems communicate effectively, smarter cost-based decisions can be made in real-time.” He adds: “Tilia Cloud makes this possible by offering automated communication across an open but data-secure framework. Our technology not only provides scalable connectivity and integration capabilities for today but opens up the infinite opportunities of IoT to expedite ongoing business improvements and innovations along the entire value chain.”

For now, Tilia has created an interesting platform but there’s clearly the potential to build a lot more around this and I expect that we will hear more on this as we get closer to Drupa. In the meantime, you can read more about Tilia Labs at its website here


Posted

in

, ,

by

Syndicate content

You can license the articles from Printing and Manufacturing Journal to reproduce in other publications. I generally charge around £150 per article but I’m open to discussing this for each title, particularly for publishers that want to use multiple stories. I can provide high res versions of images for print publications.

I’m used to working with overseas publishers and am registered for VAT with the UK’s HMRC tax authority but obviously won’t charge VAT to companies outside the UK. You can find further details and a licensing form from this page, or just contact me directly here.

Support this site

If you find the stories here useful then please consider making a donation to help fund Printing and Manufacturing Journal, either as a one-off or a repeat payment. Journalism is only really useful if it’s truly independent and this is the only such news source serving the print/ manufacturing sectors.

However, there are costs involved in travelling to cover events, as well as maintaining this site, not to mention the time that it takes to carry out research, check facts and interview people. So if you value this work, then please help to maintain it and keep it free to read.

Subscribe

Never miss a story – subscribe to Printing and Manufacturing Journal to receive an email notification every time an article is published here. It’s completely free of charge and you can cancel the subscription at any point without any hassle. There’s no need to provide any information other than an email address and subscribers details are not for sale so there’s no risk of any further marketing spam.

Related stories

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *