Global Graphics develops Mako SDK

Global Graphics, best known for its Harlequin RIP, is offering a new software development kit (SDK) called Mako aimed at developers and system integrators who need tools for preparing documents for printing through the prepress, document conversion and manipulation stages. 

Shortfin Mako shark in the North Atlantic at Condor Bank, Azores. © Patrick Doll (Wikimedia Creative Commons)

It can be used upstream of the Harlequin RIP to prepare documents for printing or can be used on its own to create custom print workflow components, such as imposing pages or combining documents into one job. It keeps track of all the relevant elements, such as fonts, to avoid multiple instances.

Developers can use Mako to split or combine files, convert colours, and add new content such as 2D barcodes, to ensure that the job is properly prepared to produce the desired output before passing it on for processing through any RIP including the Harlequin RIP.

It contains an ICC-based colour management engine that can transform colours from one colour space to another. Mako can impose any size of job – booklet, n-up or ganging or nesting – to make the best use of the print substrate. It can also analyse PDFs, showing things like page count, page dimensions and document metadata as well as the spot colour channels present in the job even down to which spot colors are used and by how much.

Mako is compatible with Windows, Linux, Mac OS, iOS, Android and Windows 10 IoT (Internet of Things), meaning that documents destined for print can be processed and previewed on any device. It allows developers to build fast previews, optimised for a given platform, such as generating SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) of a PDF page, complete with overprint simulation, for preview in an HTML5 browser.

David Stevenson, Mako product manager, explains: “Mako is a versatile SDK that developers can use to interrogate, modify or visualize documents, primarily in PDF but other page description languages such as XPS are also supported. Mako can be used to build custom print workflow components to preflight – interrogating font or colour information, for example – or to create active components that change or create new content, by imposing or combining existing documents. Mako can also be used to visualize documents on screen, in a web browser or on different devices such as tablets or smart phones.”

You can find further details on this at https://www.globalgraphics.com/globalgraphics-software/products/mako-sdk


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